Network Analysis: Centrality and Periphery in Complex Historical Structures

What is centrality and periphery in global history? It turns out that graph theory, formal network analysis, is all about finding ways to calculate centrality in graphs. How then to make the link between graph theory and historical networks?

Using Network Analysis to Question the Concepts of Centrality and Periphery in Complex Historical Structures

Keynote lecture

“Cultural Organizations: Between the Local and the Global (1880s-1960s)”
November 18 2020, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Barcelona

Martin Grandjean
University of Lausanne

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The visualizations used in this presentation come from the following publications:

Grandjean, Martin, « A Conceptual Framework for Multilayer Historical Networks », Workflows for the Digital Humanities, DARIAH-CH Proceedings, 2020.

Grandjean, Martin and Jacomy, Mathieu, « Translating Networks: Assessing Correspondence Between Network Visualisation and Analytics », in Digital Humanities 2019, Utrecht, 2019.

Grandjean, Martin, Les réseaux de la coopération intellectuelle. La Société des Nations comme actrice des échanges scientifiques et culturels dans l’entre-deux-guerres, Lausanne : Université de Lausanne, 2018, 600 p.

Grandjean, Martin, « Analisi e visualizzazioni delle reti in storia. L’esempio della cooperazione intellettuale della Societa delle Nazioni », Memoria e Ricerca, 55, 2, 2017, p. 371‑393. [French PDF available]

Data is accessible and reusable:

Grandjean, Martin, The Network of Intellectual Cooperation, Data set, 2018, github.com/grandjeanmartin/intellectual-cooperation (DOI 10.5281/zenodo.1257287).